Monday, October 19, 2015

Tara Cooper and Jenn Law at loop gallery.


Last summer, Tara Cooper participated in a residency at Landfall Trust in Brigus, Newfoundland ( During a 3-week stay, she researched the history of the area and took note of the weather. She watched an iceberg slowly dissolve in the bay, learned about Captain Bob Bartlett, who was an arctic explorer that once brought a polar bear home to Brigus and met Ray, the caretaker of Landfall, who told stories about his grandfather – a whaler that lost his life in an explosion at sea. Made in collaboration with Terry O’Neill, God Love Brigus compiles these experiences into a floating raft that mixes sculpture, print, photography and text.

Cooper draws from meteorology and creative non-fiction, resulting in projects housed under the moniker Weather Girl. She received her MFA from Cornell University, specializing in the disciplines of print, short film and installation. Recent accomplishments include residencies at Anderson Ranch Art Center, The Wassaic Project and Landfall Trust, as well as arts council grants from Ontario and Canada. Her exhibition record spans more than a decade, covering local, national and international venues. She is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Fine Arts at the University of Waterloo.

Jenn Law’s multi-disciplinary practice centres on the artifacts of print culture and our relationship to technology as the means by which we continuously reinvent ourselves. In Means & Ends, Law synergistically engages two technologies that have fundamentally shaped our understanding of the world and our place in it – print and horology (the science of time keeping).  Focused on the pocket watch and the ink bottle and combining traditional print methods with 3D printing, Law presents a collection of evolving objects transitioning between the past and the future, tradition and invention.  Here, apparent endings may become the means for innovation.

Law is an artist, writer and researcher living in Toronto. She holds a PhD in Anthropology from the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London, England, a BA in Anthropology from McGill University, and a BFA from Queen’s University.  She has worked as a lecturer, editor and curator in Canada, the UK and South Africa, and has published on South African, Caribbean and Canadian contemporary art and print culture.  Law has exhibited her work internationally and has received numerous fellowships, grants and awards for her research, including from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC) of Canada, the British Council and the British Academy.